KFTC Blog

Being an active bystander skill learned during a Green Dot training in Lexington

Posted by: Beth Howard on June 2, 2016

KFTC members learned about being an “active bystander” at a May 31 training the Central Kentucky KFTC Chapter sponsored with Green Dot Lexington.

“During the course of the evening, KFTC members enhanced their understanding of different intervention techniques that diffuse tension in potentially high-risk situations, and expanded their awareness on everyday ways they can advocate for community safety,” said Green Dot facilitator Meredith Swim.

Green Dot teaches that there are three ways to intervene in a violent situation – the Three Ds. The Three Ds are: direct, delegate and distract. Direct is directly engaging with the situation, but many of us might struggle to do that so we can also delegate to friends and family of the victim or the police. Or, we can create a distraction and de-escalate the situation.

Croeso i Seedtime! Celebrating Home & Global Community

From left: After Coal director Tom Hansel, DOVE Workshop Coordinator Lesley Smith, Tanya Turner, Elizabeth Sanders, and DOVE Workshop staff at the former coal board office turned women's education hub in Banwen, Neath, July 2015.
Posted by: Tanya Turner on June 1, 2016

This weekend we not only celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Seedtime on the Cumberland, we welcome (or croeso in Welsh) to Whitesburg, friends from very familiar looking communities in South Wales. Last summer my best friend Elizabeth and I had one of those rare, life-changing chances to visit another country, not as mere tourists, but as guests in the homes of musicians, artists, community leaders, and members of British Parliament. After days of travel on planes, trains, and buses from Whitesburg to Wales, we found ourselves rolling through hills that looked like home.

MaiFest Recap

Posted by: Joe Gallenstein on May 23, 2016

 The Northern Kentucky KFTC chapter recently helped celebrate Maifest with the community by having a table in Mainstrasse! The yearly weekend long festival in Covington is often well attended, features booths from organizations and businesses from throughout the community, carnival rides for families, and music on four different stages.

The festival this year was scheduled the weekend before Kentucky’s primary election, and members saw it as a great place to meet people from throughout the region. The chapter passed out information about www.kentuckyelection.org to more than 200 voters! Members were excited to point to the fact that all 10 candidates for Covington City Commission and 4 candidates for Mayor of Covington responded to our survey, and to talk about various campaigns KFTC is working on statewide.

Many of the members who helped table had joined in the past 6 months and were excited to be able to speak to people in the community about the work the organization is doing. From voting rights, to tax reform, to clean energy, and more, it was a great opportunity for members to feel more comfortable talking about our organization.

Despite an uncharacteristically cold weekend, the chapter was able to recruit 10 new members, register a few voters, and help remind people about the election. With the success of this festival, the chapter is looking forward to similar opportunities on the horizon.

Jefferson chapter helping sponsor metro council candidate debates

Posted by: KFTC staff on May 2, 2016

The Jefferson County KFTC Chapter, Louisville Urban League Young Professionals, FORward Radio, Zones of Hope, Louisville Black Lawyers Association, University of Louisville’s Malcolm X Debate Team, HOPE by HOPE and several neighborhood associations will host the Open Mic Debate Series the week before the May 17 Primary Election.

These Metro Council candidate debates will take place with candidates in Metro Council Districts 2, 4 and 6.

The purpose of the Open Mic Debate Series is to improve voter turnout in Metro Council Districts 2, 4 and 6 by educating and empowering voters leading up to the May 2016 primary election.

Organizers were spurred to plan these events after the low voter turnout during the November 2015 general election. Candidates in all three districts have been invited to the debates and will be asked questions developed by KFTC and solicited from the audience during the events.

Rowan Earth Day activities create pipeline awareness

Posted by: Annie Adams on May 2, 2016

To commemorate Earth Day, the Rowan County KFTC Chapter created new opportunities to raise awareness of the Utica Marcellus Texas Pipeline Project, a.k.a. Kinder Morgan’s proposal to re-purpose the Tennessee Gas Pipeline to carry hazardous natural gas liquids (NGLs).

On Friday, April 22, chapter members set up a table outside of the Fuzzy Duck, a local coffee shop and bookstore in downtown Morehead, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. provided patrons and passers-by with information about the dangers of NGLs and the perils of repurposing a seventy year-old pipeline.

Those who stopped to talk were given helpful handouts and recent news articles on the re-purposing project as well as copies of Balancing the Scales and promotional materials for KFTC.

As luck would have it, one of the U.S. Senate candidates was stopping by the same business while on the campaign trail that Friday, so the chapter was able to speak to the local press covering the candidate’s visit.

Members attend #RenterPower2016 Summit

Summit participants. Photo by Laura Harper
Posted by: Laura Harper, Southern KY & Ryan Fenwick, Jefferson County on April 17, 2016

Homes for All is a national campaign  with international connections organized to face a commonly un-acknowledged

Bowling Green turns out to discuss Kentucky's energy future

Posted by: KFTC Staff on April 15, 2016

On Thursday evening, a sold-out crowd gathered in the Corsair Distillery in Bowling Green for the first of six community dinner conversations about Kentucky’s energy future.

“We believe all Kentuckians deserve a seat at the table and a say in shaping our energy future,” said KFTC chairperson Dana Beasley Brown.

The event, called A Seat At The Table, was hosted by Kentuckians For The Commonwealth to gather public input about the best ways for Kentucky to begin a transition to a clean energy economy.

The diverse group of one hundred participants enjoyed a meal of locally grown food provided by the Pie Queen of Bowling Green and music from the local band Mud Blossom Special. After a brief presentation about Kentucky’s energy landscape, the program shifted to facilitated conversations at each table. 

Those conversations began with a chance for everyone to share a 3-minute story about some part of their relationship with Kentucky’s energy system. Then each table discussed three key questions:

  • What is your vision for Kentucky’s energy future – and why?

  • What do you think that will take? What would help?

  • What are your best ideas to ensure that all Kentuckians can benefit from Kentucky’s energy transition and are not left behind?

CKY KFTC members create Activism for Awkward People Training

Posted by: Candice Rider, CKY KFTC Member on April 15, 2016

I recently participated in a “response to the call to action” at the University of Kentucky.

Support grassroots voices: With KFTC, I became a lobbyist!

Posted by: By Laura Harper on April 14, 2016

 My name is Laura, and this year I became a lobbyist.

But I’m not on the payroll of a big corporation. I’m a homegrown, grassroots lobbyist. I work for you, and every Kentuckian who believes that we deserve a bright future.

I joined Kentuckians For The Commonwealth to work for change on renters’ rights and other issues that matter to me. And this year I participated in the Kentucky General Assembly for the first time. With KFTC, I got to sit down with legislators and talk about policy – including renters’ rights – in a way I didn’t know was possible.

KFTC celebrates its 35th anniversary this year. This was my first time to lobby, but KFTC members have been working together in Frankfort and across the state for more than three decades. Our investment in KFTC makes it possible.

Here’s how you can support grassroots voices this year and help KFTC start our next 35 years strong. Invest in KFTC during our spring campaign!

Become a Sustaining Giver. Build New Power with a recurring gift. Small monthly donations add up to a deeper investment and a bigger impact. 

Renew your membership today. You can also make a one-time gift of any size to renew your membership and support this important work for another year. 

Join KFTC. As our numbers grow, so does our power.

Thank you for investing in the Kentucky we know is possible!

Letcher Countians speak out against proposed federal prison

Posted by: Sara Estep on April 8, 2016

Last year, Congress approved funding for a new maximum security federal prison in Letcher County – the only new federal prison in the nation. The estimated preliminary cost of construction is $460 -$510 million. Rep. Hal Rogers has touted the prison as the main economic engine in eastern Kentucky. 

In Letcher County, we have so much potential, and with the right investments could create local economic engines that serve our land and our people. The Letcher County KFTC Chapter does not believe that this prison offers the economic development that Letcher County deserves.

Local residents are joining together to voice concerns about the prison. Chapter members have formed a work team to participate and to highlight alternative economic drivers that would support a just transition for our region.

On April 1, the U.S. Bureau of Prisons (BOP) announced that it was forced to re-open a public comment period for the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the prison in Letcher County after facing multiple shortcomings, including violations of public notice requirements, in its "Final EIS" released last July. A 30-day window is now open on a Revised Final EIS.

Mitch Whitaker, a local resident, recently had an op-ed published in the Lexington Herald-Leader about his concerns. Check it out, below, and keep on the lookout for more.

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