KFTC Blog

KFTC members want stronger 402 permit

Posted by: KFTC Staff on May 16, 2014

On July 31 of this year, the current General 402 Permit for Coal Mining expires.

Under the Kentucky Pollution Discharge Elimination System (KPDES), all water that leaves a mine site has to go through a pipe, which needs to be permitted so that the water can be monitored to know if it exceeds pollution standards.

Look for more information from KFTC once the first draft of the next General KPDES Permit for Coal Mining has been released. There will be an opportunity for the public to submit comments, and there likely will be a public hearing on the draft permit. Approval from the federal EPA also is required.

Coal companies have the option of either applying for an individual KPDES permit or applying to have their water discharge covered by the KPDES general permit for coal mining.

The general KPDES permit is a five-year permit developed by the Kentucky Division of Water (DoW) in order to create a streamlined process for various types of activities that discharge pollution into the streams and lakes of Kentucky. DoW must update and renew that permit every five years.

There can be a general KPDES permit for municipal sewage treatment plants, or for high schools, and there is a general permit for active coal mines and for inactive coal mines.

The general permit requires less scrutiny for potential damage to waterways and uses a “one size fits all” approach.

Aside from the difference in fees ($1,300 for a general permit and $3,300 for an individual permit), the major difference between the two is that each individual 402 KPDES permit is subject to review by the federal EPA.

Over the last few years, EPA has found reason to request additional testing and pollution discharge restrictions on about 36 individual permits, while the Kentucky Division of Water has allowed thousands of new mines and amended mine permits to be covered by the general coal mine permit.

In meetings with the Kentucky Division of Water, KFTC members have expressed their belief that Kentucky should stop using the general KPDES permit and instead require all coal companies to apply for individual permits.

They pointed out that each coal mine and each stream is different and the pollution limits should be tailored for the specific pollution coming off of each mine site.

In addition, if previous mining has already polluted a stream, then new mines should not be allowed to discharge additional pollution into the stream.

0 comments view comments

Dear Appalachia

Photo of author Anne Shelby
Posted by: Anne Shelby on May 15, 2014

With the author's permission, we are pleased to share with you this powerful poem by Clay County author Anne Shelby. She expresses beautifully the deep and conflicting emotions many Kentuckians feel about our home communities. The poem was first written for a National Public Radio program, State of The Reunion. A version of it was published in the journal Appalachian Heritage. Thank you, Anne!

0 comments view comments

2014 Primary Election: Central Kentucky Gets Out the Vote!

Posted by: Beth Howard on May 14, 2014

The primary election is on Tuesday, May 20th and the Central Kentucky Chapter of Kentuckians For The Commonwealth is getting out the vote. And, you can get involved!Hilary Crookston registering voters

KFTC has done an amazing job with candidate surveys for the 2014 Primary and the Central Kentucky chapter worked hard to develop questions for local candidates based upon local issues we all care about, such as affordable housing, homelessness, diversity, and the environment, among others. We sent surveys out to the candidates so that we can communicate their answers out far and wide and they're now online at KentuckyElection.org There are also links to candidate sites, voting location information, and more.  So please share this link with people you know.

0 comments view comments

Transition Stories: Whitesburg businesses build something together

Posted by: KFTC Staff on May 12, 2014

One thing Amelia Kirby and David Fisher both knew when they opened businesses in downtown Whitesburg was that they wouldn’t get rich. They knew it was about something larger.

I. Summit City

When Kirby and her partner, Joel Beverly, opened Summit City Lounge in 2007, they had a feeling they were launching something that would be important for Whitesburg. But they had no clear game plan other than “a belief in having a space that whatever needed to happen in the town could happen.”

The town of about 2,000 in southeastern Kentucky lacked a “community convivial space” such as a bar or pub where cross-pollination of ideas and culture could occur.

“That is a really, really significant and underestimated piece of how community building happens in a lot of places,” said Kirby. “It puts people who would not necessarily be sitting together together in a space with usually the intent of finding some common ground.”

0 comments view comments

Silas House’s Same Sun Here is a book about and for KFTC members

Posted by: KFTC Staff on May 9, 2014

KFTC member and Kentucky author Silas House published a young adult novel in 2012 called Same Sun Here, a collaboration with New York City author Neela Vaswani. The book is a series of letters between River Dean Justice, who lives in eastern Kentucky, and a girl named Meena, who lives in New York City. House talked with KFTC recently about the book.

0 comments view comments

Building New Power through leadership development

Posted by: Dana Beasley Brown on May 2, 2014

There are many important stories coming out of the 2014 General Assembly – the outcomes of bills, the work of citizen lobbyists, the story of all the rallies and lobby days KFTC participated in.

For me, one of the highlights of KFTC’s work in the General Assembly – and, really, a highlight of all the work KFTC does – is the leadership development that happens around the session.

Throughout the session, KFTC is committed to developing leaders and helping their voices be heard. Whether it’s my friend Al lobbying for the first time. Or Mantell from Lexington taking his turn at the mic in front of the large crowd at the Voting Rights Rally. Or all the KFTC members who serve on various strategy teams that, throughout the session, contribute to our collective game plan … KFTC is about developing leaders.

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately about KFTC’s approach to leadership development.

0 comments view comments

BIKE the VOTE!

Posted by: Donovan Taylor on April 30, 2014

The Saturday before the Kentucky primary election voter registration deadline, Jefferson County Chapter of KFTC organized Bike the Vote, a pop-up voter registration drive in West Louisville.  Eighteen people volunteered to register voters, some riding bikes between the four pop-up locations; two grocery stores and two parks. After four hours and eight miles of biking, the group registered 40 voters. Chapter members registered a total of 84 voters during the week of April 14.

0 comments view comments

Building new economic power on May Day week

Posted by: Kentuckians For The Commonwealth on April 28, 2014

It's May Day week – a great time to take action that builds new economic power.

0 comments view comments

Perry County chapter hosts KFTC 101 workshop

Posted by: Jessie Skaggs on April 24, 2014

Perry County members at the KFTC 101 WorkshopAt their March chapter meeting, members in Perry County discussed different ideas for possible upcoming workshops and events that the chapter could have this year. Wanting to reach newer current members as well as potential members, they decided to hold a series of workshops that would educate people on KFTC, how we organize, and our issue areas. This past Monday, the Perry County chapter hosted the first of these, a KFTC 101 Workshop

0 comments view comments

Opportunity to attend the East Kentucky Leadership Conference

Posted by: Kentuckians For The Commonwealth on April 18, 2014

0 comments view comments

Page

Subscribe to KFTC Blog