KFTC Blog

Get Out Film Screening

Posted by: Joe Gallenstein on December 1, 2017

The Scott County chapter co-hosted a showing of the film Get Out with allies in Georgetown as a continuation of a racial justice film series. Partnering with the Scott County Public Library, the film and conversation was promoted by KFTC, the Georgetown-Scott County NAACP, Central Kentucky Speaking Up for Racial Justice, Georgetonw College Ambassadors for Diversity, and Georgetown Justice Speaks.

The film, a psychological thriller that focuses on race relations in America, was picked in part to separate from the past showing of more documentary style film series. Promoting the event to the public, it was a showing that brought students from Scott County High School and Georgetown College, residents of Scott County, and other members of the larger community.

The conversation dealt with both the messages of the film, and also the experience of folks in the community. From the erasure that people of color often experience in society and in movements, trends often being taken from communities of color to generate wealth within white communities, micro aggressions shown in the film and experienced in real life, and the differences in the experiences of white people in the film showing and people of color.

The Scott County chapter hopes to continue to build on this event to continue a conversation on how to achieve racial justice and equity in our Commonwealth.

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Arty Pie Party Success!

Great Turnout!
Posted by: Joe Gallenstein on December 1, 2017

For the past several years members in Scott County have hosted an art and dessert auction known as the Arty Pie Party! This years event was another rousing success, with over 50 pieces of art or baked goods being up for auction.

The patrons of the Scott County Arty Pie Party have been incredibly generous, with local artists donating original pieces, members donating works they have collected over the years, delicious baked goods, and originals by well known Kentucky artists. Every year this event is the chapter’s fundraiser, and this one did not disappoint!

Northern Kentucky chapter unpacks politics

Michelle Slaughter, Jason Reser, Arnold Simpson, Pam Mullins, Ken Rechtin, and Sister Janet
Posted by: Joe Gallenstein on November 29, 2017

Northern Kentucky members have expressed an interest in trying to help understand how local government works since the resistance training in January. Out of that training they hosted an Unpack Politics forum to help people better understand how different levels of government work. Be it city, county, school board, or state government, many people are unsure as to what government is responsible for what.

NKY Supporting Our Neighbors Immigrant Rights Workshop

Heyra and Jose lead discussion on next steps attendees can take to protect and promote immigrant rights.
Posted by: Amy Copelin on November 22, 2017

Heyra Avila, an animated young woman from Florence, addressed a group of us fellow northern Kentuckians on a Wednesday night at the end of long day. Her energy was infectious. Her story made a deep impression. She opened up about a precarious, hard-to-imagine trek that she and her family made over a decade ago between Mexico and the U.S.

Her parents, wanting to give their children a more solid future, had chosen to leave their small, metal sheet roofed home not too far from the U.S. border and try their luck over here. Heyra described herself as “lucky.” The dangerous journey they made across the dessert when she was four was safer than it was for most pursuing the same route. Her family had the good fortune of finding a car, providing them with overnight shelter and preventing them from complete exposure to the desert elements or predators—likely both animal and human.

9 Reasons Why Kentucky Needs to Fund Public Pensions

Posted by: 9 KFTC members on November 21, 2017

We’ve built serious momentum in Kentucky around stopping Governor Bevin’s dangerous public pension bill while advancing a commonsense plan to find revenue to fund the pension and other pu

Let's build grassroots power together during our fall campaign

Posted by: Meta Mendel-Reyes on November 13, 2017

Soky Member reflects on the Fund Our Pension rally in Frankfort

Posted by: Joyce Adkins on November 8, 2017

When I became a member of KFTC a few short months ago, I wanted to find ways to make a difference in our community and in our Commonwealth. I had such an opportunity when I was able to attend the Fund Our Pension Rally in Frankfort on November 1. I have been shocked and horrified by our Governor’s depiction of state workers, and especially of public school teachers, as greedy, lazy, and yes, unsophisticated. As one speaker from Vocational Rehabilitation pointed out, he saved as many sick days as he could so if he or his wife or one of his kids had an accident or a serious illness, he would have time to take off. If a worker comes to work with the sniffles or on crutches or with a cast on their arm (I have done all three) and still does their job, and then retires with a couple of months of sick time built up, they should be paid for it.  They could have stayed home and left work undone, but they didn’t.  That is their time accrued and promised to them. The Governor has tried, with some success, to drive a wedge between the private and public sectors.  What people need to know is that when I retired three months ago, the college-educated person who was hired to take my place started at $12.15 an hour.  They could have started at Target with a high school diploma for $11.00 an hour, so, believe me, we don’t work for the state out of greed. I heard one speaker talk about how state workers clear our streets, teach our kids, inspect our swimming pools, help the disabled find jobs, keep us safe, put out our fires, and on and on. No, these are not lazy people, these are people who work for little compensation to care for their fellow citizens. And unsophisticated was just another word for stupid, so I will not even stoop to answer that one. It was clear from the signs and the speeches that no one was happy with that insult.

KFTC Benefit Show in Harlan County

Posted by: KFTC Staff on November 8, 2017

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Dozens turned out to a KFTC benefit show in Harlan County hosted by local music scene organizing group From The Ruins on November 3rd.

"I believe the show we had on Friday was exactly what we set out do. It was local bands that have formed in the past year, all from Harlan, and the scene of people that came out to enjoy it was better than expected. We hope to see continued growth and unity within the music scene as it comes together more," said Adam Peace, a member of From The Ruins and new KFTC member.

The show featured Brooklyn Collins, Mandela, and Swamp Rat.

Madison County chapter's 2017 Halloween Spectacular!

Posted by: Matthew Frederick on October 31, 2017

As a fall season balance to its successful spring pie auction, the Madison County chapter of KFTC held its first Halloween Spectacular. Around 80 people gathered in the basement of Union Church in Berea to celebrate the season, the Halloween holiday, and the work of the membership as well as to promote the good cheer that comes from supporting the ongoing mission of KFTC.

The cool fall evening party began as guests started entering to the enticing smells coming from the chili table. One of the main features of the evening, the chili cook-off put around a dozen slow-cookers full of homemade chilis in competition. After devouring the superb offerings, attendees were invited to vote for the winning chili by placing a few dollars in a chili’s glass donation jar, with all of the resulting proceeds benefiting KFTC and its mission.

KFTC members travel to D.C. to lobby for the RECLAIM Act

Posted by: Nikita Perumal and Jacob Mack-Boll on October 24, 2017

 

Hattie, Larry, Sarah, and Judge Executive Jim Ward meet with Megan Bell and Jake Johnson of Congressman Hal Rogers' Staff

 

This October, KFTC members Sarah Bowling, Larry Miller and Hattie Miller spent time in Washington, D.C. lobbying their congresspeople to pass the 2017 RECLAIM Act.

Larry is a retired coal miner from western Kentucky. “I worked underground for 23 years and very proud of that work,” he said.

“I believe, however, that coal will never again be Kentucky's primary economic engine. I am concerned that investments in mining operations here will eventually end. I take no pleasure in saying that, because I made a good living in coal for a long time, but it just looks like a reality to me.

4th Annual Smoketown GetDown for Democracy

Posted by: Dari’Anne Hudson on October 2, 2017

The cold and chilly weather brought by hurricanes ceased in Louisville the 4th annual Smoketown GetDown for Democracy block party. The energy of friends, neighbors, vendors, and performers were only rivaled by the clear, bright sky. Taking place at the Jefferson County Chapter headquarters of 745 Lampton Street, the block party proved to be another success.

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Louisville has experienced many ups and downs of the current political climate in the nation. Widespread violent crime, threats to undocumented immigrants, continued environmental injustices, and many other issues are evidence of the uphill battle that is present. Yet, hundreds gathered in Smoketown to celebrate gains in affordable housing, community revitalization, and unified organizing efforts across various issues. The Smoketown neighborhood is no different in its successes – it has maintained a strong momentum toward creating a neighborhood where all residents thrive.

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