LGBTQ equality

Bereans for Fairness rally

Meta Mendel-Reyes"When I first came to Kentucky, my employer did not have domestic partner benefits, and we  couldn't pay all our medical bills. As a lesbian/member of the LGBTQ community, I am proud to belong to an organization that fights for equality for all Kentuckians."

Meta Mendel-Reyes
Madison County

Resources

Fairness Campaign

Kentucky Fairness Alliance

Kentucky ACLU

Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

Lexington Fairness

Eastern Kentucky Fairness on Facebook

Bereans For Fairness on Facebook

Sample of a local Fairness Ordinance

As KFTC has grown, expanding our vision of equality for all Kentuckians has been a labor of love and a transformative internal process. While many members shared this vision of equality for decades, in 2004 our Steering Committee shared a series of deeply emotional conversations, meetings, and personal reflections and eventually adopted language to our platform to include our LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered and Queer or Questioning) communities. Since then (and well before), our local chapters and statewide members have contributed to a growing movement for fairness, safety and celebration of diversity in Kentucky and beyond.

From offering our staff domestic partner benefits to lobbying our elected officials for fairness ordinances and anti-bullying legislation, KFTC members continue to prioritize our vision for a better Kentucky all Kentuckians deserve. As you can read in our blog feed below, our local chapters have recently prioritized LGBTQ equality through Fairness Ordinance organizing in Berea, safe restroom campaign in central Kentucky, creating LGBTQ support networks in Perry County, and much more.

What is a Fairness Ordinance:  A Fairness Ordinance would prohibit discrimination in the workplace, housing, and public accommodations based on sexual orientation or gender identity. We believe that all Kentuckians have a right to live without fear of unjust discrimination, regardless of their race, religion, sexual orientation, or gender identity. As written, Kentucky law does not guarantee this right, and must be changed. We support a statewide Fairness law and also Fairness ordinances at a local level until a statewide law is establish.

Singing for Democracy

Join with Kentucky Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival participants from across Kentucky as we sing, speak out and stand together for democracy.

Follow the leadership of people impacted by systemic racism, poverty, the war economy, ecological devastation, and the nation's distorted morality as they speak out.

Love and Acceptance

Kimmy Sandlin and Mari Froude pose before the 2nd Annual NKY Pride Parade!

On June 10, 2018 I had the privilege to march in the Northern Kentucky Pride Parade. I marched with the Kentuckians for the Commonwealth Northern Kentucky chapter. I am currently interning with KFTC with Joe Gallenstein as my supervisor. My friend, Mari, had stayed over the night before so we could wake up early to prepare. We were both so excited to go to the parade and to support the LGBTQ+ community. We woke up early that morning to meet Joe at Roebling Point Books and Coffee where we started our day with a cup of coffee and donuts. I had been sick for the past week, and wasn’t sure I’d have the energy needed to participate. That doubt disappeared once we walked over to our spot in the parade and waited for the parade to start.

While waiting I could already feel how important it is for our communities to show support. I could feel all the love and acceptance as I spoke with others participating in the parade. We talked about issues that were close to our hearts, and how we plan to achieve our goals. Once the parade started, I was happy to see people from our communities showing their support and I enjoyed seeing how happy the children were to catch pieces of candy. Being a part of all the love was enlightening.  Music played, people danced and sang. Despite being exhausted from my cold, my friend and I, danced and sang along as well. Being goofy and jumping around was so much fun and being a part of the parade has been a highlight of my summer. Although, we should not limit support for the LGBTQ+ community to just one month, I am very excited to have been a part of the Pride Parade this year and I can’t wait to do it all over again next year!

Lexington PRIDE

The Lexington Pride Festival is an annual event created to celebrate the LGBTQ+ people, their friends, families, and allies. The family-friendly festival is held on the last Saturday of June at the Robert Stephens Courthouse at the corner of North Limestone and Main Streets.

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