Racial Justice

KFTC is working for a day when discrimination is wiped out of our laws, habits, and hearts.

Help stop the “Youth Incarceration Bill”

UPDATED: March 28, 2018

Right now is a key moment for a piece of legislation that would negatively impact Black and Brown young people in Kentucky.

House Bill 169, the "Youth Incarceration Bill," passed the House on March 15 and Senate leaders were quick to take parlimentary maneuvers to fast-track the bill for passage. Then on March 27, after compelling testimony on why and how the state could invest in programs to prevent gang violence, the Senate Judiciary Committee instead voted to pass HB 169 and support locking up more young people, and for longer.

This bill does not make Kentuckians safer, but it would cost taxpayers an additional $19 million a year, and lead to even higher levels of youth incarceration, especially among youth of color. The bill would:

  • Expand the definition of a gang membership.
  • Require more severe sentences and harsher charges for anyone who fits the newly expanded definition of gang membership, without judicial discretion.
  • Make the penalties for gang recruitment more severe.

Northern Kentucky members show "Get Out"

Members of the Northern Kentucky chapter hosted a film screening of Get Out, the acclaimed directorial debut of Jorand Peele. The film, which deals with race relations in the U.S. in a unique way, was a critical success last year, and was a great source of discussion.

Scott County members participate in 16th Annual MLK March!

Marchers at the 16th Annual MLK March in Georgetown!

For the 16th straight year, the Georgetown-Scott County NAACP Unit celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with a march and program commemorating the legacy and message of the late civil rights leader. In the current environment that we are in, with growing income inequality, elected leaders playing to racial and religious differences, and a struggle to define what it means to be American, it was an important day to stand together.

Conversations to build racial understanding in Berea

One of the most persistent issues in the United States is learning how to support diverse communities. Our history has created a dynamic whereby our towns are enriched by many cultures and backgrounds, but our society is still reckoning with systemic and entrenched racism.

In November 2017, the Madison County KFTC Chapter’s Racial Justice Committee met and decided to expand its structure to include a community-building focus to its approach in addition to its more action-focused work. This work was spearheaded by members Wendy Warren (steering committee representative) and Shannon Roberts Smith.

The goal of the community-building focus of the Racial Justice Committee is to provide space for committee members and allies to form relationships outside of planning and implementing campaigns and/or actions. Also, they hope to broaden reach and encourage conversations that can be difficult for many members of the community who are new to racial justice work.

Page

Subscribe to Tags: Racial Justice