New Energy and Transition News

Eastern Kentucky can have a future; Mitch McConnell holds one of the keys.

March 13, 2018
Lexington Herald Leader

I operate a small business based in Clay County that reclaims abandoned coal mines.

Anti-solar bill hurts Kentucky’s energy future. It’s also a case of dirty politics.

March 16, 2018
Lexington Herald Leader

The anti-solar energy bill that was narrowly passed by the House and is awaiting action in the Senate illustrates two weaknesses in Kentucky’s civic character: We try to cling to the past, and we tolerate dirty politics.

House Bill 227 was written by electric utilities to protect their monopolies by discouraging Kentuckians from installing solar panels on their homes.

16 coal-county leaders implore McConnell to move RECLAIM Act

March 15, 2018
Lexington Herald Leader

Congress has pending before it the opportunity to provide a $1 billion boost to the local economies struggling with the decline of the coal industry.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has the power to make this a reality for hundreds of Kentucky families looking for the means to make a decent living and stay in the Kentucky communities they call home.

That’s why we — and 14 other county judge-executives across the state — sent a letter to McConnell imploring him to see that the RECLAIM Act becomes law soon.

Kentuckians tell McConnell time is up, pass RECLAIM now

March 14, 2018 at 05:32pm

Senator Mitch McConnell is in a position to direct more than $100 million to economic and community development projects in communities hardest hit by the decline in coal mining.

Kentuckians held an action outside his Lexington office today asking him to waste no more time in doing that.

“The time is now to pass the RECLAIM Act,” said Lyndsay Tarus, the Economic Transition Coordinator for the Alliance for Appalachia. “This is a jobs bill. The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement has estimated that 4,600 jobs could be generated through the RECLAIM Act across the country.

Members host Georgetown Town Hall

March 1, 2018 at 10:45am

On February 24 members in Scott County hosted a town hall for residents to ask the questions of their state legislators they were concerned about. The chapter invited all state legislators who represent part of Scott County to attend, with State Representatives Mark Hart and Phillip Pratt attending. 

Climate change pushes LG&E's parent company to slash coal-burning in Kentucky

February 7, 2018
The Courier-Journal

The parent of Kentucky's two large utilities – LG&E and KU – has ordered a major reduction in emissions blamed for global warming by eliminating "the bulk" of its coal-burning in the coming years. 

Against energy subsidies? Lawmakers complaining about solar should dig into this.

February 9, 2018
Lexington Herald Leader

If legislators want to complain about solar subsidies, maybe they need to take a fresh look at coal subsidies. Commission an independent economist to add up all the costs and benefits to the state budget of coal, gas, oil, solar and other energy technologies and compare them. If we’re going to subsidize anything, maybe it should be the future and not the past.

Kentuckians speak up against anti-solar House Bill 227

February 5, 2018 at 05:33pm

H.B. 227, proposed by GOP lawmakers early in January 2018, would smash Kentucky's independent solar businesses and shatter our opportunity to create a thriving clean energy economy. Here are reflections from Kentuckians on why this bill would lead our state away, not towards, the bright future and just transition that we deserve.

Will GOP let utilities crush solar (and 1,200 jobs) in Kentucky? This could get ugly.

February 5, 2018
Lexington Herald Leader

You would think after the sexual harassment scandal involving former Speaker Jeff Hoover and three other colleagues, House Republicans would not want to bring more embarrassment upon themselves. But you would be wrong.

Solar bill committee gets three new members, raising charges of 'vote packing'

February 2, 2018
The Courier-Journal

A committee in Frankfort that has so far failed to take any votes on a controversial bill to curb solar power in Kentucky will be getting three new members — two Republicans and a coal-country Democrat.

Questions of vote packing immediately surfaced.