KFTC Blog

EKY chapter meetings start the year out on strong, positive notes

Posted by: Angel Hill on February 15, 2018

In January and February, two eastern Kentucky chapters have started the year off with a bang.

Harlan County chapter members met on January 25 and did some deep visioning on what they want the chapter to be working on over the course of the next year, bringing long-time members as well as folks new to KFTC together.

“I'm excited for the direction the chapter is moving in. I believe this can be a great thing for Harlan County, and it can move Harlan in a very positive direction, for the benefit of all who live here,” Lily Milovnik, a Harlan County High School student, said in regards to the January chapter meeting.

In addition to the powerful Harlan County chapter meeting, the newly formed Cumberland Chapter petitioned and officially became a chapter at the February steering committee meeting after a very strong meeting in January. The chapter covers Laurel, Knox, Whitley and Pulaski counties. The group plans to focus their work on environmental justice, racial justice, voting rights and LGBTQ+ issues.

At their February chapter meeting, members put some power behind vision and came up with action items and next steps to move them forward on their four key work areas.

“I’m excited to be surrounded by like-minded folks who love their home and have the same progressive ideas as myself. I’m even more excited to be in a chapter that is local to me because it’s bringing more people together and the meetings aren’t too far away for me to attend now," reflected Sarah-Sage Hoffman, a Cumberland Chapter member.

As these chapters continue to dig further into developing their work, it's clear that both are going to do exciting things in 2018!

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Kentuckians speak up against anti-solar House Bill 227

Posted by: 11 Kentuckians on February 5, 2018

H.B. 227, proposed by GOP lawmakers early in January 2018, would smash Kentucky's independent solar businesses and shatter our opportunity to create a thriving clean energy economy. Here are reflections from Kentuckians on why this bill would lead our state away, not towards, the bright future and just transition that we deserve.

KFTC annual meeting moving to Berea College, August 3-5

Posted by: KFTC staff on February 3, 2018

Following five years of successful annual membership meetings at General Butler State Park, the KFTC Steering Committee voted to relocate the KFTC Annual Meeting to Berea College on August 3-5, 2018.

The vote followed a year-long conversation in which committee members met with KFTC staff and Berea College representatives to explore a possible relocation.    

The annual meeting is an important and necessary part of KFTC’s efforts to build grassroots power in Kentucky. It provides unique opportunities for members and folks who are interested in KFTC from every corner of the state and different backgrounds to come together for a weekend of gaining leadership skills, building community and having fun.

We all need to act to protect our U.S. democracy

Posted by: Lois Gillespie on February 2, 2018

Years ago, a popular song had the refrain, “What a difference a day makes.”  For me, I’d alter those lyrics to “What a difference a comment makes.” For it was this comment, “I’m afraid for our democracy” uttered during a political conversation a year ago that led me to the Kentuckians For The Commonwealth Constitutional Convention lobby day on January 23.

In the past year I’ve learned more about what that comment means and now I’m afraid for our democracy, too.

Madison chapter to again host Berea State of the City speech

Posted by: KFTC staff on January 30, 2018

In 2017, the Madison County chapter hosted a groundbreaking State of the City Address in Berea that changed the culture of this annual event.

Previously, the event had been held during business hours and was hosted by the Berea Chamber of Commerce, which used it as an annual fundraiser.

After conversations with Mayor Steve Connelly, the chapter was given the opportunity to re-envision the event and make it more welcoming and inclusive of many folks.

Victory: Scott County landfill denied zoning expansion

Posted by: Joe Gallenstein on January 26, 2018

Hundreds of Scott County residents came out to oppose the application by the Central Kentucky Landfill to have 170+ acres near it being rezoned from agricultural use to industrial in order to allow

Northern Kentucky members show "Get Out"

Posted by: Joe Gallenstein on January 26, 2018

Members of the Northern Kentucky chapter hosted a film screening of Get Out, the acclaimed directorial debut of Jorand Peele. The film, which deals with race relations in the U.S.

Scott County members participate in 16th Annual MLK March!

Marchers at the 16th Annual MLK March in Georgetown!
Posted by: Joe Gallenstein on January 17, 2018

For the 16th straight year, the Georgetown-Scott County NAACP Unit celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with a march and program commemorating the legacy and message of the late civil rights leader. In the current environment that we are in, with growing income inequality, elected leaders playing to racial and religious differences, and a struggle to define what it means to be American, it was an important day to stand together.

Conversations to build racial understanding in Berea

Posted by: Becca Parrish on January 15, 2018

One of the most persistent issues in the United States is learning how to support diverse communities. Our history has created a dynamic whereby our towns are enriched by many cultures and backgrounds, but our society is still reckoning with systemic and entrenched racism.

In November 2017, the Madison County KFTC Chapter’s Racial Justice Committee met and decided to expand its structure to include a community-building focus to its approach in addition to its more action-focused work. This work was spearheaded by members Wendy Warren (steering committee representative) and Shannon Roberts Smith.

The goal of the community-building focus of the Racial Justice Committee is to provide space for committee members and allies to form relationships outside of planning and implementing campaigns and/or actions. Also, they hope to broaden reach and encourage conversations that can be difficult for many members of the community who are new to racial justice work.

Progressive voices join to win Fairness ordinance in Paducah

Posted by: KFTC staff on January 10, 2018

In a historic win for Fairness in western Kentucky, Paducah has become the ninth city in Kentucky to adopt an anti-discrimination ordinance that protects LGBTQ+ people.

On January 9, more than 250 people packed the Paducah City Hall chambers, about two-thirds of the crowd showing support. After lengthy public testimony and debate, the measure passed by a 4 to 1 vote.

The ordinance prohibits discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations. An amendment to include exemptions for religious business owners failed by a similar 4 to 1 vote. Such an exemption exists in state law, however.

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